Landlord was RIGHT to evict 87 year old!

I am never shy of attacking social landlords.  I will often give both barrels and unashamedly so – yet Weaver Vale Housing Trust was right to evict the 87 year old tenant that has caused such a furore on social media.

tiddles

I have also just seen here that WVHT are also allowing the tenant back into her property, which is frankly more than she deserves but a major hat tip to the landlord.

No judge would have awarded an outright possession order in such a case unless it was absolutely necessary. The tenant had made her home a significant fire risk and had resisted at every turn requests to make it not so.  We also know that her three sons who live with her must have done nothing about this significant fire risk too.  We also know that social services were involved in this case too – yet still the district judge awarded an outright possession order.

That simply does not happen unless the facts of the matter warrant (no pun intended) and absolute possession order.

The fact the tenant is 87 years of age is what everyone has their knickers in a twist over.  Sorry but a grave fire risk to her neighbours is a grave fire risk whether the tenant was 87 or 27.  Imagine if you or your family lived next door to a property that is a tinder box through the hoarding that was evident in this case!

What many are choosing to overlook in this case is what was reported yet conveniently ignored: –

Mark Cashin, deputy chief officer at Cheshire Fire and Rescue, said: “Hoarding certainly is a growing issue for fire and rescue services. “It presents significant risks for individuals, communities and firefighters. “This is not about us telling people how they should live their lives it is about keeping people and firefighters safe, something that we have a responsibility to do.

 

This matter now appears to have been resolved:

The 87-year-old, and her three sons, met with officials from Weaver Vale Housing Trust on Saturday.  They were told they can return to the house on Langford Road, in Lostock Gralam, once it is safe. “We have offered Mrs Appleton an opportunity to return as soon as practically possible,” said trust chief executive Steve Jennings in a statement.  “That is subject to the house being made safe and for some items to be placed in storage in line with previous requests made to the family.”

If this 87 year old and/or her three sons had done something about this when they had the opportunity – which they must have been given so many chances to do else the judge would never have awarded an outright possession order in the first place – then this sorry mess which is ALL the fault of the tenant not the landlord would never have happened!

Still nothing as powerful as a picture of an old person and some scurrilous reporting is there!!

 

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9 thoughts on “Landlord was RIGHT to evict 87 year old!

  1. Nope, no understanding of MH and total trust in HA courts and SW? And frankly the stigmatising of hoarders is an emergent bigotry which is sad to see being repeated here.

    1. Disagree. The reports state social services were involved – which must have been for the hoarding issue which I agree is a MH issue. The critical issue is the judge awarding an OUTRIGHT possession order. That would never have happened if the tenant was receptive to dealing with hoarding issues.

      I’m the last person NOT to attack bad practice of landlords and courts and social workers, yet the decision was 100% correct in my view

  2. nail on the head, worked for environment health as a pest controller and dealing with some hoarders is usually related to a term known in the trade as ‘filthy and verminous’ which means pestilence has taken hold of the hoarders household.we would step in as a ‘public health concern’ meaning neighbouring terraced properties would also suffer pestilence and resultingly litigate against the local authority for not keeping its district free from vermin.as per 1949 damage by pests act , section 4 ., its a very emotive subject , removing people from their home against their will , but as we are ever increasingly living side by side in close proximity with party walls etc , inevitably members of the public, the same people and people think we are cruel and interfearing still approach us for assistance as they themselves dont wish to live with the associated pestilence / odour that can emanate from a neighbouring hoarder.No offence folks, but i speak the truth.

  3. Every cloud has a silver lining, and I believe that May’s story will have an unexpected happy ending. She’s now got plenty of press coverage, and there are librarians and historians out there who would love to study her collections of memorabilia and help her by cataloguing them, while simultaneously helping her find fitting places to keep them where they can be on show and be loved and cherished without involving a fire hazard. They look enchanting, see the photos here http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3432234/Hoarder-87-breaking-heart-losing-three-year-battle-against-eviction-home-lived-60-years.html

  4. There’s been a steady campaign, many TV shows using hoarders for cheap freak show entertainment. Also as we know health and safety is used repeatedly inappropriately to enable authorities to deny anything they feel like. Reminds me of when venues say no wheelchairs because they are a fire risk. It’s prejudice. Bottom line if she owned the home, no action would happen, if she was rich she would be called an eccentric and left alone, it shows again tenants are second class citizens. That your mental health is subject to others judgement when you are in poverty. Class and disability prejudice all wrapped up. Eviction should never ever be a response to this, they will have hastened her death with the trauma it caused.

  5. I know of a tenant whose house is in a terrible condition. Yes there are Mental Health issues involved, the tenant has terrible hygiene, for example, but he has refused all offers of help and support, won’t allow the community nursing team into his house, the landlord has been around several times to tidy the garden just for him to leave it in a mess again. The landlord and social services visit regularly only to be told that he is ‘okay, leave me alone’. Sadly the gent has no family either 😦 At the end of the day you cannot force people to accept help!

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